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AIRWAY MANAGEMENT


SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS AIRWAY MAY BE BLOCKED:


  • Casualty is in distress and indicates they can’t

breathe properly

  • Casualty is making snoring or gurgling sounds

  • Visible blood or foreign objects are present in the

airway

  • Maxillofacial trauma (severe trauma to the face

IMPORTANT! Remove any visible objects obstructing the airway, but do not perform a blind fingersweep


Airway Management


a. Unconscious casualty without airway obstruction:

- Chin lift or jaw thrust maneuver

- Nasopharyngeal airway

- Place the casualty in the recovery position


b. Casualty with airway obstruction or impending airway

obstruction:

- Chin lift or jaw thrust maneuver

- Nasopharyngeal airway

- Allow a conscious casualty to assume any position that best

protects the ai rway, to include sitting up.

- Place an unconscious casualty in the recovery position.

- If the previous measures are unsuccessful, refer to a medic

immediately.



IN A CASUALTY WITHOUT A FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY

OBSTRUCTION, YOU CAN PERFORM THE FOLLOWING MANEUVERS:

AIRWAY





Unconscious casualty's tongue may have relaxed, causing his tongue to BLOCK the airway by sliding to the back of the mouth and covering the opening to the windpipe.




If you suspect that the casualty has suffered a neck or spinal injury, use the jaw-thrust method.



If the casualty is breathing on their own but unconscious or semi-conscious and there is no airway obstruction. Further airway management is best achieved with a Nasopharyngeal Airway (NPA).

An NPA can be used on a conscious or unconscious casualty to help open/ maintain an open airway.


DO NOT attempt to insert an NPA if there is clear fluid coming from nose or ears. This may be cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and may be an indication of possible skull fracture.



NPA Sizing and Insertion


The NPA comes in a variety of sizes. Sizing is very easily accomplished with the NPA, average females – size 6.0 and average males – size 7.0. The larger the casualty is, the larger the tube will have to be and vice-versa with a small casualty.


Sized by measuring from the tip of the patient’s nose to the earlobe.





Casualty Positioning


If a casualty can breathe on their own, let them assume the best position that allows them to breath, including sitting up.

If a casualty can breathe on their own in a position of choice, DO NOT force them into a position or perform airway procedures that causes them difficulties in breathing.


Casualties with severe facial injuries can often protect their own airways by sitting

up and leaning forward.





Casualty Positioning


Assist a conscious casualty by helping them assume any position that ALLOWS THEM TO BREATH EASILY, including sitting-up.


For an unconscious casualty not in shock, place them into the RECOVERY POSITION





SUMMARY


  • We identified

  • We opened

  • We maintained and managed


3 comments

3 Comments


Learned this years ago but forgot the recovery position.

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Unknown member
Jun 27, 2023

Thank you, this was VERY helpful and easy to understand I read this at least 5 times.

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Boris K. "Sentry"
Boris K. "Sentry"
Jun 08, 2023

Thank you for this simple yet highly informative post. I've learned quite a few useful tips from it.

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